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William Tenney and Eliza L. Webb

HUSBAND:
William TENNEY. [Familytree].
Born 10 March 1802 at Grafton, Grafton County, New Hampshire; the eldest son of William TENNEY and Judith READ.

When he was young his family moved to New York.

He married Eliza WEBB in 1819 in New York. They lived, at least for a time, at Holland Purchase, New York.

The home they created was a happy home, where love and kindness were the law. His daughter Betsy Jane said, A discordant jar I never heard beneath our impretentious, yet ever neat and tidy dwelling. They were Methodists. They were prayerful and led exemplary lives, and taught their children to pray. For several years prior to hearing the Mormon Elders preach the gospel, they stood alone waiting for the light to come, which they were expecting. In the meantime, his wife had many remarkable dreams, and also the Word of Wisdom given to her, nearly the same as given to the Prophet Joseph Smith. She told her friends and neighbors. Some ridiculed and others said she was going crazy.

They first heard the gospel in the winter of 1833-1834. Not long after this Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdrey preached some 7 or 8 miles from where they lived. The Prophet gave a minute description of the coming forth of the Book of Mormon, and also of the visions and visitations of angels from time to time. When he and his wife returned from the meeting, they both said it must be true, for it was impossible for men as young and inexperienced as they were to testify with such honesty and candor, or with such power, that it seemed to penetrate the hearts of all who heard.

During the following year, the family received the gospel with joy and rejoicing. He and his wife and their oldest daughter Betsy Jane were baptized by Elder Truman Height in September of 1834. Before they were baptized, the family was well respected by all their acquaintances, but that quickly changed after their baptism into the Mormon faith.

In June of 1835 six Apostles came to their home; Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball, Orson Pratt and three others. In November of 1835 the family moved to Kirtland, Ohio. They purchased the house and lot of Jared Carter next door to the Prophet Joseph Smith. They lived there for two years, seeing the church authorities almost daily. There comenced working on the construction of the Kirtland Temple as soon as they were settled. He labored at painting or carpentry work, whatever he was called on to do. He also gave 50 dollars for the Temple construction. They were present at the dedication of the Kirtland Temple.

In April of 1838 the family left Kirtland, Ohio and moved to Far West, Missouri. They arrived there on the 5 July 1838 and camped on Shoal Creek. After resting awhile, they moved to Davies County, about eight miles from Adam-ondi-Ahman. They bought a farm there, but had to leave it in October for fear of the mobs. They then moved to Diahman, where they lived in a tent made of coverlids of sheets. They had to be constantly on guard for fear of the mobs. Finally all were required to move into Far West. They experienced intense cold while crossing the prairie. On the way, at about half-way there, they stayed at the Littlefield House, living with Brother and Sister Abott.

In April of 1839 they left Far West in company with the Saints who, at the recommendation of Joseph Smith and to escape mob violence, made their way to Illinois. They crossed the Mississippi River at Quincy and settled in Adams County.

On 27 June 1844, the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum were murdered at Carthage Jail. William died just a few months later, on 9 (8) October 1844 at Quincy, Adams County, Illinois.

WIFE:
Eliza L. WEBB. [Familytree].
Born 17 November 1803 at Brookfield, Madison County, New York; daughter of James Henry WEBB and Betsy FAVILLE.

She married William TENNEY in 1819 in New York.

The home they created was a happy home, where love and kindness were the law. His daughter Betsy Jane said, "A discordant jar I never heard beneath our impretentious, yet ever neat and tidy dwelling." They were Methodists. They were prayerful and led exemplary lives, and taught their children to pray. For several years prior to hearing the Mormon Elders preach the gospel, they stood alone waiting for "the light to come," which they were expecting. In the meantime, Eliza had many remarkable dreams, and also the Word of Wisdom given to her, nearly the same as given to the Prophet Joseph Smith. She told her friends and neighbors. Some ridiculed and others said she was going crazy.

They first heard the gospel from the elders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the winter of 1833-1834. Not long after this Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdrey preached some 7 or 8 miles from where they lived. The Prophet gave a minute description of the coming forth of the Book of Mormon, and also of the visions and visitations of angels from time to time. When he and his wife returned from the meeting, they both said it must be true, for it was impossible for men as young and inexperienced as they were to testify with such honesty and candor, or with such power, that it seemed to penetrate the hearts of all who heard.

During the following year, the family received the gospel with joy and rejoicing. He and his wife and their oldest daughter Betsy Jane were baptized by Elder Truman Height in September of 1834. Before they were baptized, the family was well respected by all their acquaintances, but that quickly changed after their baptism into the Mormon faith.

Some months after they had joined the church, her son William, then about two years old, became sick and was near death. Her father, James WEBB was the only ordained Elder in town who could administer to him, but he had been away from home for several days. As his condition worsened, his family watched with intense ansiety and tearful faces. He had not spoken or taken notice of anyone for two days, and had every symptom of the near approach of death. His sister Betsy Jane had strong faith that through the laying on of hands he could be healed and begged permission to go for her grandfather. At last they relented, even knowing that he was away from home, and she started off taking a shortcut path through the meadow. In the meantime, James had arrived home and did not sit down, but started immediately for Eliza's house. When Betsy Jane got to her Grandma's house and was told that she missed him on the way, she hastened back as fast as possible. To her surprise and joy, when she entered her brother's sickroom, she found that her brother who an hour before lay lifeless, was sitting in his chair whittling with his Pa's knife, which he asked for as soon as his grandfather had taken his hands off his head. By the power of faith he was made whole immediately. The family, "felt to thank and praise our Heavenly Father that we were permitted to hear the gospel in this the last dispensation, and know of a surety that we were being make partakers of it's promises and blessings."

In June of 1835 six Apostles came to their home; Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball, Orson Pratt and three others. In November of 1835 the family moved to Kirtland, Ohio. They purchased the house and lot of Jared Carter next door to the Prophet Joseph Smith. They lived there for two years, seeing the church authorities almost daily. There his father worked on the construction of the Kirtland Temple. They were present at the dedication of the Kirtland Temple.

In April of 1838 the family left Kirtland, Ohio and moved to Far West, Missouri. They arrived there on the 5 July 1838 and camped on Shoal Creek. After resting awhile, they moved to Davies County, about eight miles from Adam-ondi-Ahman. They bought a farm there, but had to leave it in October for fear of the mobs. They then moved to Diahman, where they lived in a tent made of coverlids of sheets. They had to be constantly on guard for fear of the mobs. Finally all were required to move into Far West. They experienced intense cold while crossing the prairie. On the way, at about half-way there, they stayed at the Littlefield House, living with Brother and Sister Abott.

In April of 1839 they left Far West in company with the Saints who, at the recommendation of Joseph Smith and to escape mob violence, made their way to Illinois. They crossed the Mississippi River at Quincy and settled in Adams County.

On 27 June 1844, the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum were murdered at Carthage Jail. Her husband died just a few months later, on 9 (8) October 1844 at Quincy, Adams County, Illinois.

During the next few years she lived in her daughter, Betsy Jane's home in Quincy and helped with the children while Betsy taught school. When the Saints left Nauvoo, they wanted to gather with them, but felt there were too many obstacles in the way, and it looked quite impossible. They tried to content themselves with holding their weekly meetings at Mother Pinkham's house. There were nine sisters there who would meet and pray together and read out of the scriptures and the Deseret News. They felt that the meetings were feasts, indeed, and that they had their spiritual strength renewed. They had no priesthood to preside but each did the best that they knew how. Nevertheless, they felt the lack of strength to be obtained from asssociation with the Saints and longed to join them now that they had learned where it was that they had settled.

Sometime during the next the winter of 1859, her daughter Betsy Jane sold her house and gave the money to her brother Warren to purchase an outfit for the trip west to rejoin the Saints. He bought two new wagons, four yoke of oxen, a set of carpenter tools, oilcloth for the wagons and other things necessary for the trip. Warren, his wife Julia, with Eliza and her daughter Eliza took one team and Betsy Jane and her three sons took the other team, and they set off for Utah. They left Quincy on 27 April 1860. They had a successful journey across the plains and arrived in Salt Lake City on 9 August 1860. At first they camped in a tent and the wagons until they got settled. Warren and Betsy Jane soon moved to Payson, but Eliza and her daughter Eliza stayed in Salt Lake City.

She was sealed to her husband on 15 August 1865 in the Endowment House by Heber C. Kimball. She died 17 November 1883 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah.

CHILDREN of William TENNEY and Eliza WEBB:
  1. Betsy Jane TENNEY. Born 1 December 1824 in Hanover, Chatququa County, New York. She was baptized with her parents into the Mormon Church in September 1834. She traveled with them to Kirtland, Ohio, Far West, Missouri, and Quincy, Illinois and felt great joy in association with the Saints and suffered great hardships at the hands of the mobs. She married (1) 24 January 1844 at Quincy, Adams County, Illinois to Robert LOOSE, who was from London, England. They had three sons. He never did join the Mormon Church, but always said he was proud of his "Mormon wife." In the month of May, 1854, while reviewing their 10 years of married life, he paused and very earnestly said to her, "Jane, you have taught me what no other mortal could have done, to control myself," and he often called her his "Savior." He died on 4 July 1854. She continued to live in Quincy, Illinois, teaching school to support herself, until 1860, when she sold her home, gave the money to her brother Warren to buy wagons and and outfit, and then, with her mother and sister Eliza, they traveled together to Utah to rejoin the Saints. The traveled in the Warren Walling Company. With them as her sons Warren Arthur Robert Loose and Charles Edwin Loose. She married (2), and was sealed, on 24 AUG 1861 to Orrawell SIMONS, as his second wife. They were sealed by Brigham Young in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. She was very happy in a plural relationship with him, his first wife, Martha Dixon and his following, third wife, Kate.
  2. Warren Reed TENNEY. [Familytree]. Born 27 July 1827 at Hanover, Chautauqua County, New York. He married (1) Julia Amanda PHELPS on 8 May 1859 at Ridgley, Platte County, Missouri. He married (2) Clara LONGHURST on 8 June 1867 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah. He died about 26 April 1889 at Flagstaff, Coconino County, Arizona.
  3. William Rush TENNEY. Born in 1832 at Chautauqua, Chautauqua County, New York. He died in 1856 at Quincy, Adams County, Illinois.
  4. Edwin Rich TENNEY. Born in 1835 at Chautauqua, Chautauqua County, New York. He died in 1851 at Quincy, Adams County, Illinois.
  5. Emma Victoria TENNEY. Born in 1840 at Payson, Adams County, Illinois. She died in 1851 at Quincy, Adams County, Illinois.
  6. Eliza Lamercia TENNEY. Born in 1845 at Quincy, Illinois. She married George Quale CANNON in 1865, his third wife. They had two sons. She died in 1908.


SOURCES:

HOW ARE WE RELATED

James Henry Webb  married (1) Betsy Faville,  married (2) Hannah Griswold
                           |                           |       
                    Eliza L. Webb and William Tenney    Amanda Melvina Webb and Burton Harmon Phelps
               Warren Reed Tenney  -    married    -    Julia Amanda Phelps
                Warren Moroni Tenney married Ella Ann Hamblin
                 Clive Vernon Tenney and Minnie Williams
                 Mildred Ella Tenney and Glenn Russell Handy
                 Deborah Lee Handy and Rodney Allen Morris