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Judah and Tamar

HUSBAND:
JUDAH.
JUDAH was born (in 1870 B.C.-S4) in Hebron; the fourth son of JACOB and LEAH.
According to Classical rabbinical literature, Judah was born on 15 Sivan (early June). (S6).

35 She [Leah] conceived again, and when she gave birth to a son she said, “This time I will praise the Lord.” So she named him Judah.[e] Then she stopped having children. Genesis 29:35.

The Hebrew name for Judah, Yehudah, literally "thanksgiving" or "praise," is the noun form of the root Y-D-H, "to thank" or "to praise." His birth is recorded at Gen. 29:35; upon his birth, Leah exclaims, "This time I will praise the LORD," with the Hebrew word for "I will praise," odeh sharing the same root as Yehudah. (S6).

Judah's next appearance is in Gen 37, when he and his brothers cast Joseph into a pit out of jealousy after Joseph approaches them, flaunting a coat of many colors, while they are working in the field. It is Judah who spots a caravan of Ishmaelites coming towards them, on its way to Egypt and suggests that Joseph be sold to the Ishmaelites rather than killed. (Gen. 37:26-28, What profit is it if we slay our brother and conceal his blood? ... Let not our hand be upon him, for he is our brother, our flesh.) (S6).

Classical rabbinical sources also allude to a war between the Canaanites and Judah's family (not mentioned in the Hebrew Bible), as a result of their destruction of Shechem in revenge for the rape of Dinah; Judah features heavily as a protagonist in accounts of this war. In these accounts Judah kills Jashub, king of Tappuah, in hand-to-hand combat, after first having deposed Jashub from his horse by throwing an extremely heavy stone (60 shekels in weight) at him from a large distance away (the Midrash Wayissau states 177? cubits, while other sources have only 30 cubits); the accounts say that Judah was able to achieve this even though he was himself under attack, from arrows which Jashub was shooting at him with both hands. The accounts go on to state that while Judah was trying to remove Jashub's armour from his corpse, nine assistants of Jashub fell upon him in combat, but after Judah killed one, he scared away the others; nevertheless, Judah killed several members of Jashub's army (42 men according to the midrashic Book of Jasher, but 1000 men according to the Testament of Judah). (S6).

He married (1) ?, the daughter of Shuah, the Canaanite.

Judah marries the daughter of Shua, a Canaanite. Genesis chapter 38 Judah and his wife have three children, Er, Onan, and Shelah. Er marries Tamar, but God kills him because he was wicked in the sight of the Lord. (Gen. 38:7). Tamar becomes Onan's wife in accordance with custom, but he too is killed after he refuses to father children for his older brother's childless widow, and spills his seed instead. Although Tamar should have married Shelah, the remaining brother, Judah did not consent, and in response Tamar deceives Judah into having intercourse with her by pretending to be a prostitute. When Judah discovers that Tamar is pregnant he prepares to have her killed, but recants and confesses when he finds out that he is the father (Gen. 38:24-26). (S6).

He married (2) TAMAR (TAMER).

In the Book of Genesis, Judah emerges as a leader. With Reuben he interceded for his half-brother Joseph's life when his brothers sought to kill him after he told of a vision that he would one day be a king and his brothers would bow before him. His brothers were already jealous because Joseph was their father's favorite and he had presented him with a beautiful coat of many colors. Judah was the spokesman for his brothers before Joseph in Egypt. In the Exodus his tribe was in the lead, and it settled in the rich land of Southern Palestine, extending from the Dead Sea to the Mediterranean, according to scripture. Within its borders was Jerusalem. It gave its name to the Kingdom of Judah.

Judah receives the most favorable treatment in Genesis among Jacob's sons, which according to biblical historians is a reflection on the historical primacy that the tribe of Judah possessed throughout much of Israel's history, including as the source of the Davidic line. Although Judah is only the fourth son of Leah, he is expressly depicted in Genesis as assuming a leadership role among the 10 eldest brothers, including speaking up against killing Joseph, negotiating with his father regarding Joseph's demand that Benjamin be brought down to Egypt, and pleading with Joseph after the latter secretes the silver cup into Benjamin's bag. (S6).

When Benjamin was held in bondage following the accusation of stealing Joseph's cup, Judah offered himself among his brethren as a bondman in replace of him, but Joseph was strict that the punishment is only applied to the one who was guilty, not to the innocent ones. (S6).

Judah's position is further enhanced through the downfall of his older brothers: Reuben, the eldest, cedes his birthright through sexual misconduct with Jacob's concubine Bilhah (Gen. 35:22), and the bloody revenge taken by Simeon and Levi following the rape of Dinah (Gen. chap. 34). disqualifies them as leaders. The eternal legacy of these events are foreshadowed in the deathbed blessing of Jacob (Gen. 49:1-33). Judah is praised as "a lion's whelp" whose brothers "shall bow down before thee," and "the sceptre shall not depart from Judah" (Genesis 49:10), the latter a clear reference to the aspirations of the united monarchy. (S6).

He died (after 1670 B.C.-S4) in Rameses, Goshen, Egypt.
Classical sources differ on the date of death, with the Book of Jubilees advocating a death at age 119, 18 years before Levi, but the midrashic Book of Jasher advocating a death at the age of 129. (S6).
WIFE (1):
?
Daughter of Shuah, the Canaanite.

CHILDREN of Judah and the daughter of Shuah:
  1. Er.
  2. Onan.
  3. Shelah.


WIFE (2):
TAMAR. (Tamer).
This was also his daughter in law twice, Numbers 26:19, Gen 28:29,30.

Tamar was born in Hebron.

She died in Rameses, Goshen, Egypt.

CHILDREN of Judah and Tamar:
  1. PHAREZ.
  2. ZERAH. (Zarah, Zara) .


SOURCES:

ANCESTORS OF JUDAH
Adam (4001BC-3071BC) and  Eve
Seth (3871BC-2959BC)
Enos (3766BC-2861BC)
Cainaan (3676BC-2766BC)
Mahaleleel (3606BC-2711BC)
Jared (3541BC-2579BC)
Enoch (3379BC-2948BC)
Methusalah (2214BC-2345BC)
Lamech (3127BC-2350BC)
Noah (2945BC-1995BC)
Shem (2443BC-1843BC)
Arphaxad (2343BC-1905BC)
Salah (2308BC-1875BC)
Eber (2278BC-1814BC)
Peleg (2244BC-2005BC)
Reu (2214BC1975BC)
Sereug (2182BC-1952BC)
Nahor (2152BC-2004BC)
Terah (2122BC-1918BC)
Abraham (2052BC-1877BC) and Sarah
Isaac (1892BC-1713BC) and Rebekah
Jacob (Israel) (1892BC-1739BC)  and Leah
Judah (c1870-after1670BC) and Tamar


HOW ARE WE RELATED
Judah  and Tamar 
Zerah (Zehrah Zarah Zare) and Electra the Pleiade 
Mahol
  |
(descendant of?)
  |
Dardanus (Dara) (King) of ACADIA) and Batea of Teucri
Erichthonius (King) of ACADIA) and Astyoche of ACADIA 
Trois of ACADIA  (1337? BC - 1330? BC)  and Callirhoe (Teucri)
Assaracus (Ascaoracus) the DARDANIAN  and possibly Hieromneme
Capys (Capis Capps) the DARDANIAN  
Anchises the DARDANIAN  and Themiste of Troy
Aeneas (the Dardanian) (King of LATIUM)  and Creusa (Cassandra) of Troy
Iulus ASCANIUS (founder & 1st King) of ALBA LONGA  and Roma
Silvius (Hisicion) d' ITALIA   
Brutus of the BRITONS  and of Latium and Ignoge of GREECE   
Camber of CAMBRIA & CORNWALL  
Gorbonian of CAMBRIA & CORNWALL  
Dyfynwal Hen of CAMBRIA & CORNWALL  
Cyngen (Duke/King) of CAMBRIA & CORNWALL  
Asser (Duke/King) of CAMBRIA & CORNWALL  
Bleiddud (Duke/King) of CAMBRIA & CORNWALL  
Henwyn (Duke/King) of CAMBRIA & CORNWALL  
Cunedda (King) in BRITAIN  (? - 772? BC)  
Rhiwallon (King) in BRITAIN  
Gwrwst (King) in BRITAIN  (? - 735? BC)  
Seisyll (Sisillius I) (King) in BRITAIN  
Antonius (King/Duke) of CORNWALL 
  |
(descendant of?)
  | 
Aedd MAWR (King/Duke) of CORNWALL   
Prydain ap AEDD of CORNWALL  
Dyfnarth (Duke/King) of CORNWALL  
Crydon (Krydon) the CAMBRIAN  
Cerwydr the CAMBRIAN  
Capoir of the DRUIDS (King) of BRITONS  
Digueillus (King) of BRITONS  
Heli I (King) of BRITONS  
Cas `the Exile'  
Huw the MIGHTY  
Lugh II `the Shining One'  (? - 103 BC)  
Beli (Heli II)  (? - 55 BC)  
Caswallon ap BELI (King) of the CATUVELLAUNI  (? - 47 BC)  
Addedomaros  (? - 25+ BC)  
Dubnovellus   
Beli (Belus) of BRITAIN  and Annia (Antonia) 
Afallach ap BELI of BRITAIN  and poss.  Anna PROPHETE 
Owain (Eugein) ap AFALLACH of BRITAIN  and  Athilda of BRITONS 
Brychwain (Brithguein) ap OWAIN of BRITAIN  and Emerita verch COEL of B.
Alyfon (King) of SILURIA  
Anyn ap ALYFON  
Dingad (Dindad Dingarth) ap ANYN  
Greidiol (Cridol) `Galofydd' ap DINGAD  
Ceraint (Geraint Keraint Kerint) ap GREIDIOL  
Merion (Meirion) ap CERAINT  
Arch (Arthen Arth) ap MERION  
Caid (Keit Kait Ceidio) ibn ARCH  
Gwyn ap CAID  
Ceri (Keri) Hir Lyngwyn ap GWYN  
Baran ap Ceri  (c20BC-?)
Llyr Lleddiarth ap Baran (c20AD-?) and Penardun
Bran Siluria ap Llyr Lleddiarth (Bran Fendigaid)(Bran the Blessed),  Arch Druid
Avallach ap Bran
Euddolen Ap Afallach
Eudos Ap Euddolen
Eifydd Ap Eudos
Eudeyrn ap Eifydd and Millisanndia verch Seysild
Euddigan ap Eudeyrn and Generys verch Tegwaret
Ryddrech Rhodri ap Euddigan and Margareta verch Eynon
Gloyw Gwallthir ap Rhodi
Gwidolin ap Gloyw
Gwidol ap Gwidolin and Dinoi of Lidinin
Guorthenau Vortigern ap Gwidol and Sevira ferch Macsen
Cadeyrn, King of Powys, (Gwrtheyrn) Vortigern  
Kadell (Cadell) ap Caderyn (c580-?)
Gwnfyw Frych  ap Cadell 
Gwynnan ap Gwnfyw Frych
Gwriawn (Gwylawr)  ap Gwynnan  (c615-?)  
Byordderch ap Gwriawn (c650-?)
Bywyn ap Byordderch  (c705-?) 
Gwaethgar Gwaeddgar ap Bywyn (c755-?) 
Gwrgant (Gwrgeneu) ap Gwaeddgar (c790-?)
Cadfarch ap Gwrgant  (c830-?)
Ynyr ap Cadfarch (c870-949) and Rheingar verch Lluddoccaf
Tudor Trevor ap Ynyr (900-948) and Angharad verch Hywel Dda
Dyngad ap Tudor Trevor (c930-?) and Sissely verch Seferws (Seferys)
Rhiwallon ap Dyngad of Maelor Gymraeg (c965-1073) 
Caradog ap Rhiwallon (c1000-?)
Breichiol ap Caradog (c1030-?) 
Pyll ap Breichiol (c1060-?) 
Meurig ap Pyll of Penhros  (c1095-?) 
Caradog ap Meurig of Penrhos  (c1125-?)
Iorwerth ap Caradog (c1160-?) and Alis verch Bleddyn Broadspear
Adam ap Iorwerth (Adam Gwent) (c1190-1246), of Llanfriafael and Goleuddydd verch Hywel
John ap Adam (Adam Fynchan)(John ap Adam) (c1220-c1270) and N.N. Burchill/(verch Dafydd)
John ap Adam  (c1255-c1310)  and Elizabeth de Gournay
(Sir) Thomas ap Adam (c1307-c1342)  and Joan Inge
John ap Adams (c1332-1376) and Millicent Bessylls
John Adams (c1360-c1424)  and Clara Powell  (changed name from ap Adams to Adams)
Roger Adams (1392-?) and Jane Ellyott
Thomas Adams (1422-?) and Maria Upton
John Adams (1452-?) and Jane Rannelegh (Benneleigh)
John Adams (1482-1557) and Catharine Stebbing
John Adams (1502-?)  and Margaret Squier
Richard Adams (c1530-1603) and Margaret Armager
Robert Adams (1568-1602) and Elizabeth Sharlon
Robert Adams and Eleanor Wilmot
Elizabeth Adams and Edward Phelps
Samuel Phelps and Sarah Chandler
John Phelps and Sarah Andrews
John Phelps and Deborah Lovejoy
Samuel Phelps and Margaret Nevins
Ebenezer Ferrin and Lydia Phelps
Samuel Ferrin and Sally Clotilda Powell
Lydia Powell Ferrin and George William Washington Williams
George William Williams and Harriett Thurston
Minnie Williams and Clive Vernon Tenney
Mildred Ella Tenney and Glenn Russell Handy
Deborah Lee Handy and Rodney Allen Morris