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John Douglas and Elizabeth Gusterfield

HUSBAND:
John Douglas. (Douglass).
Born on 4 November 1701 in New London, New London, Connecticut; Son of William Douglass and Hannah Mercy Bigelow.

John (4), is the son of (William3, Robert2, William1). (S2).

His father removed with his family to Colchester, in 1724. (S2).

John married Elizabeth Gusterfield, of Colchester, on 27 January 1728. They were farmers and lived and died in Colchester. (S2).

Brother of Robert L. Douglass, who fought in the War of 1812. (1784-1858) Served in Captain Charles Moores Company, New York Militia. [This info from familysearch, but this is obviously the wrong generation. Robert must have been a great nephew].

John Douglas had brothers William and Joshua who went to NJ. (S3).

He died in 1742 in Colchester, Connecticut.

WIFE:
Elizabeth Gusterfield. [also said by some (Sa,S2) to be Quitterfield, but this is not certain].
Born in 1704. (S1).

If she was Elizabeth Quitterfield (b. 3 Jun 1709 in Colchester), she may have been the daughter of Clement Quitterfield and Priscilla Collins. (S1,S2).

CHILDREN of John Douglas and Elizabeth Gusterfield:
  1. Mary Douglas. Born on 29 November 1729 in Colchester, Connecticut.
  2. John Douglas. Born on 12 October 1731 in Colchester, Connecticut. He died on 16 Juy 1734.
  3. Elizabeth Douglas. Born on 5 December 1733 in Colchester, New London, Connecticut. she married James Webb.
  4. Daniel Douglas. Born on 15 October 1735. Daniel Douglas married Jemima Webb. He was a deacon of the Saybrook Baptist Church. He died in 1812.
  5. Dorothy Douglas. (1738-1832).
  6. Israel Douglas. Born on 9 December 1742 in Colchester, Connecticut. He married Abigail Hull of Clinton, Connecticut on 26 February 1768. He settled at Saybrook, now Chester, and was a deacon of the church there until his removal to Leyden, New York, whither his sons, Israel (2), Jonathan and Nathan had preceded him. He died on 28 March 1818 in Leyden, New York. Of his children it was written by one who knew them well: "They were a hardy, thrifty and industrious class, moral and religious in their tendencies; a faithful record of whose lives and experiences would honor the historic name they bore, and they may be pardoned for having a little clannish pride."


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